WWW2002 - Tuesday, 7 May 2002 Schedule
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THE ELEVENTH INTERNATIONAL
WORLD WIDE WEB CONFERENCE

   Sheraton Waikiki Hotel
Honolulu, Hawaii, USA
7-11 May 2002
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Tutorials/Workshops Schedule
Tuesday, 7 May 2002
(times subject to change)

Morning Tutorials (08:30 - 12:00)

Afternoon Tutorials (13:30 - 17:00)

Full-Day Tutorials (08:30 - 17:00)

Full-Day Workshops (08:30 - 17:00)

Breaks for all sessions


TA1 - Meeting the Challenges of Web Applications Development: The Web Engineering Approach

Web-based systems now play increasingly important roles in many applications. As we now rely heavily on them, there is pressing need for improved quality, performance and availability of these systems. However, most Web-based systems are still poorly developed and in an ad hoc manner. Hence, they perform poorly, do not scale up and are prone to failures.

Web engineering is a proactive approach that addresses these concerns and offers systematic approaches and disciplined processes for development of large, complex Web-based systems and applications.

The tutorial will discuss problems facing Web application development and introduce the rapidly emerging field of Web engineering. It is specifically targeted to address the needs of growing community of Web application developers, IT and business professionals, E-Commerce system implementers, project managers. General understanding of Web page and site development, and also of general application development and/or software engineering are desirable.

The tutorial will:

The participants are advised to attend the follow-on tutorial TP1, Managing the Growth, Maintainability and Quality of Web Applications: The Web Engineering Approach, which will focus on scalability, maintainability, testing, quality assurance, design considerations and Web project management.

Presenters:
San Murugesan is a Professor at the School of Multimedia and Information Technology, Southern Cross University, Australia. During 1993 - 2001, he worked at the University of Western Sydney (UWS), where his colleagues and he led the efforts in identifying and developing the field of Web Engineering. His current interests include: Web engineering, e-business, e-transformation, Web personalisation and information retrieval.

Yogesh Deshpande is a senior lecturer at the School of Computing and Information Technology and a founding member of the Web-based Information Systems and Methodologies (WebISM) Research Group at the University of Western Sydney which has led the efforts in identifying and developing the field of Web Engineering. This research group collaborates with several other groups across the world engaged in this emerging field.

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TA2 - Web Service Composition

Web services have been gathering much attention lately in the industry, from researchers, and even in the press. Everyone agrees about their fundamental importance to information technology architectures and applications.

The main advantage of web services arises when we can compose them to create new services. Unfortunately, much of the attention on web services has been focused on the lower-level, infrastructural matters, often down to encoding syntaxes and unnecessarily narrow means of invoking services. For web services to be effectively composed requires an understanding of deeper concepts. These concepts have been developed in diverse parts of computer science, especially, heterogeneous databases, distributed computing, artificial intelligence, and multiagent systems.

This tutorial will present the necessary concepts, architectures, theories, techniques, and infrastructure to compose web services. It will include a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in selected application areas. This tutorial gives the essential background for anyone planning to learn about and contribute to the principles and applications of service composition. It will guide practitioners by highlighting best practices in service composition and introduce students and advanced developers to the key trade-offs as well as the limitations of current approaches.

The major sections of this tutorial will include:

The tutorial has a sequel, TP2 - Service Composition Techniques, which discusses techniques and best practices for service composition.

Presenters:
Munindar P. Singh an associate professor in computer science at North Carolina State University. From 1989 through 1995, he was with the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). Munindar's research interests include multiagent systems and web services. He focuses on applications in e-commerce and personal technologies. His 1994 book "Multiagent Systems," was published by Springer-Verlag. He coedited "Readings in Agents," which was published by Morgan Kaufmann in 1998. He edited five other books and authored several technical articles. Munindar's research has been recognized with awards and sponsorship from the National Science Foundation, IBM, Cisco Systems, and Ericsson.

Munindar is the editor-in-chief of IEEE Internet Computing and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems. He serves on the steering committee for the IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing.

Munindar received a B.Tech. in computer science and engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, in 1986. He obtained an M.S.C.S. from the University of Texas at Austin in 1988 and a Ph.D. in computer science from the same university in 1993.

Michael N. Huhns is a professor in computer science and engineering at the University of South Carolina, where he also directs the Center for Information Technology. Previously he was a Senior Member of the Research Division at the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation. Prior to joining MCC in 1985, he was an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at the University of South Carolina, where he also directed the Center for Machine Intelligence. Mike has been an adjunct professor in computer sciences at the University of Texas.

Mike is a member of Sigma Xi, Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, ACM, IEEE, and AAAI. He is the author of over a hundred technical papers in machine intelligence and an editor of the books "Distributed Artificial Intelligence," Volumes I and II, and "Readings in Agents." His research interests are in the areas of distributed artificial intelligence, machine learning, enterprise modeling and integration, and software engineering. He writes a column "Agents on the Web" for IEEE Internet Computing.

Mike was an associate editor for IEEE Expert and the ACM Transactions on Information Systems. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems. He is on the Editorial Boards of the International Journal on Intelligent and Cooperative Information Systems, the Journal of Intelligent Manufacturing, and IEEE Internet Computing. He is on the Advisory Board for the First International Conference on Multiagent Systems, 1995, and has been on the Advisory Boards for several of the International Workshops on Distributed Artificial Intelligence.

Mike received the B.S.E.E. degree in 1969 from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in electrical engineering in 1971 and 1975, respectively, from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles.

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TA4 - Security

Tutorial Web site: http://www.ibiblio.org/gio/www2002/tutorial/

This tutorial will cover security technologies that can apply to the web. Attendees will learn how to protect their application exposed to the Internet, most common ways to attack a web site and their countermeasures. A metodology to design and realize secure web services will be also presented. Privacy, e-commerce, hardening, intrusion detection and cryptography will be covered to give to the attendees a global overview of the risks of having a web service on line and the techninques to defend it. Security and privacy implications of new generation of Web platforms and XML based web services will be analyzed and discussed.

This tutorial is targeted to Web architects, Security professionals, IT Managers. A knowledge of Web architectures and security fundamentals is prerequisite for attending this session.

Presenters:
Gioacchino La Vecchia is a Manager of Accenture and administrator of the Italian W3C Office. He has been serving the International World Wide Web Conferences Series since the beginning initially as volunteer then as Co-Chair. He has been working in the field of web security since the Web started as contributor of NCSA HTTPD, teacher of web security specialization in the University of Pisa. He is also co-chair of EuroWeb 2001.

Claudio Telmon is a freelance computer security consultant, specialized in network and Internet security. He has been working on projects ranging from ISP security to home banking. Teaching in network security courses both for the University of Pisa and for private companies, he is technical manager of the security laboratory of the Department of Informatics of the University of Pisa.

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TA5 - Experience Design

How can you prepare for potential users and their expectations?

Plan to leave them with a lasting impression.

This presentation focuses on usability through the perspective of the overall online experience. It will introduce an emerging discipline called Experience Design and explain why this new discipline will become more and more essential to developing a successful Web site. The presentation will include case studies, examples, and commentary on why most Web sites fail, and what designers and companies can do to succeed in giving the user a better experience. The presentation will detail the elements of design that constructively contribute to a Web site's success as well as why the user is often ignored.

Skills that attendees will learn in this session:

Presenter:
Greg Nations is the Vice President of Interactive Services at Methodologie. Methodologie is a strategic design firm that brings brands to life by creating compelling print and digital communications. Greg directs Methodologie's interactive team toward strategic design and development consistent with the overall business needs of the client. He has over eight years of experience in interactive design and production, and loves keeping his ear to the ground on emerging technologies that have a positive effect on his clients' business objectives. Greg helps companies realize their business goals from an online perspective and understand the importance of leveraging their brand in the e-business environment.

Additionally, Greg teaches interactive design and development courses at the Art Institute of Seattle.

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TP1 - Managing the Growth, Maintainability and Quality of Web Applications: The Web Engineering Approach

The functionality of Web applications as well as their performance and quality needs grow very rapidly. Further, the content management is another daunting and challenging task. The way we address these needs is critical for successful development, implementation and ongoing maintenance of Web applications. Web-based systems need to be designed and built for scalability, maintainability, high performance and reliability; these features can't be added later. The Web system developers play major role in ensuring the quality, reliability and robustness of e-business systems, and thereby in increasing the users' confidence on the system.

This tutorial will address these needs, discuss how to successfully manage the growth, maintainability, quality of Web applications, and provide insights on Web project management. Web application developers, IT and business professionals, E-Commerce system implementers and project managers would find the tutorial very useful. General understanding of Web page and site development, and also of general application development and/or software engineering is desirable.

The tutorial will:

Participants are encouraged to attend the tutorial TA1, Meeting the Challenges of Web Applications Development: The Web Engineering Approach, to get a better insight into the challenges of Web development and the foundations of Web Engineering.

Presenters:
San Murugesan is a Professor at the School of Multimedia and Information Technology, Southern Cross University, Australia. During 1993 - 2001, he worked at the University of Western Sydney (UWS), where his colleagues and he led the efforts in identifying and developing the field of Web Engineering. His current interests include: Web engineering, e-business, e-transformation, Web personalisation and information retrieval.

Yogesh Deshpande is a senior lecturer at the School of Computing and Information Technology and a founding member of the Web-based Information Systems and Methodologies (WebISM) Research Group at the University of Western Sydney which has led the efforts in identifying and developing the field of Web Engineering. This research group collaborates with several other groups across the world engaged in this emerging field.

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TP2 - Service Composition Techniques

This tutorial has a companion "prequel" tutorial, TA2 - Web Service Composition, which emphasizes service composition concepts. Attendees with sufficient background may skip the prequel.

Some of the key techniques for service composition (e.g., dealing with their discovery and engagement) were developed in the areas of databases, distributed computing, artificial intelligence, and multiagent systems. These are generally established bodies of work that can be readily adapted for service composition. Some additional techniques, although inspired by these areas, must be developed from scratch, because they address the essential openness and scale of web applications that previous work did not need to address. Both classes of key techniques should be incorporated into our best practices for service design and composition. In many cases, they can be applied on top of the existing approaches.

This tutorial seeks to explain the true purposes of service composition, to evaluate existing approaches, and to present existing techniques from other areas that can be adopted for service composition, and lastly to introduce emerging techniques for addressing challenges that are unique to service composition.

This tutorial is presented at a beginning graduate student level. We expect it to be accessible to web programmers, advanced developers, and students.

The major sections of this tutorial will include:

Presenters:
Munindar P. Singh is an associate professor in computer science at North Carolina State University. From 1989 through 1995, he was with the Microelectronics and Computer Technology Corporation (MCC). Munindar's research interests include multiagent systems and web services. Munindar's research has been recognized with awards and sponsorship by the National Science Foundation, IBM, Cisco Systems, and Ericsson.

Munindar is the editor-in-chief of IEEE Internet Computing, and a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems. He serves on the steering committee for the new IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing.

Michael N. Huhns is a professor in computer science and engineering at the University of South Carolina, where he also directs the Center for Information Technology. Mike's research interests are in the areas of distributed artificial intelligence, machine learning, enterprise modeling and integration, and software engineering. He writes a column "Agents on the Web" for IEEE Internet Computing.

Mike was an associate editor for IEEE Expert and the ACM Transactions on Information Systems. He is an associate editor for the Journal of Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems.

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TP3 - SVG

Tutorial Web site: http://www2002.org/svgtutorial/

Until recently, the way to add schematic drawings to a web page was to define the drawing as an image (in GIF, PNG, JPEG or some other format) and insert the image into the web page using the <IMG> element. This has the following major drawbacks:

  1. Image size: The size of an image is defined by the width and height of the image (in pixels) and the number of bits allocated to each pixel in the image.
  2. Fixed resolution: Once the image has been defined at a specific resolution, that is the only resolution available.
  3. Binary format: Image formats store the image data in some binary format which makes it difficult to embed rich metadata about the graphic to help search engines.
  4. Minimal animation: The GIF format allows several images to be defined in one image file ("animated gifs"), but each image is essentially static.
  5. No inherent hyperlinking: Web pages depend on hyperlinking. To do this is with images requires the use of image maps defined as part of the enclosing HTML page.

Scalable Vector Graphics, or SVG, is the World Wide Web Consortium's Recommendation for defining 2-dimensional schematic drawings such that the size is more directly dependent on the content in the drawing and the resolution is whatever the user requires. Zooming in on an SVG drawing allows greater and greater detail to be seen if the drawing is complex.

This tutorial will include SVG attributes for:

Presenter:
Bob Hopgood was the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory's W3C Advisory Committee representative where he was active in getting a Web profile for the Computer Graphics Metafile agreed and helped establish W3C's Offices in Europe. He was also Programme Chair for WWW5 in Paris. On his retirement, he worked for the World Wide Web Consortium for a year as Head of Offices. He is now a visiting Professor at Oxford Brookes University. He has over 35 years experience in computer graphics, especially in standardization activities and has lectured internationally on emerging web standards. He has given a number of seminars and tutorials on SVG to international audiences during 2000 and 2001.

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TP4 - Web Services Security

Security is a vital pre-requisite to development of many Web Services. The lack of a security infrastructure is one of the most commonly voiced objections to deployment of web Services.

The aim of this tutorial is to provide participants with a roadmap of Web Services security, including both techniques with which to secure Web services and security services that are packaged as Web services. This course will cover all the W3C and OASIS security standards currently in process and proposals that are on the horizon but not yet in process.

It is the intention that this tutorial be a 'state of the art' presentation covering the most up to the minute breaking developments. The presenter is in constant communication with all the people who are currently defining the 'state of the art'.

Some familliarity with Web services concepts is desirable.

Phillip Hallam-Baker is currently one of the leading architects in the Web Services Security field. He is the lead designer of the XKMS specification and a major contributor to the SAML specification. The presenter is one of the original authors of the highly successful VeriSign PKI course.

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TP5 - Capacity Planning

This tutorial introduces quantitative performance predictive models for every major Web scenario, showing precisely how to identify and address both potential and actual performance problems. It provides a quantitative framework for planning the capacity of Web services and understanding their behavior.

The tutorial focuses on two main topics. It presents an integrated capacity planning methodology that covers benchmarking, load testing, workload forecasting, and performance modeling of Web services. It shows how to perform a quantitative analysis of Web service availability. The tutorial presents many examples and case studies that show how to use each technique in problems related to portals, search engines, e-business, and mobile and streaming-media applications.

Presenter:
Virgilio Almeida is Professor of Computer Science at the Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil. He holds a Ph.D. in ComputerScience from Vanderbilt University. In 1996, Dr. Almeida spent a year as Visiting Professor at Boston University. He also held visiting research positions at XEROX PARC and Hewlett Packard Research Laboratory in 1997 and 2001, respectively. He published over 60 technical papers and was co-author of four books. He was the recipient of various prizes, and best paper awards including the Compaq/Brazil Award for Research and Development in Computer Science. He has consulted extensively for government and private organizations in the area of capacity planning and performance modeling (ex.: IBM, Travelocity, etc.)

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TF1 - XML and Data Management

As Web applications manipulate an increasing amount of XML data, there is growing interest on how to manage this data. Because XML is extensible and flexible, it can be used in applications with radically differing needs. This flexibility also implies that one cannot expect to find out-of-the-box solutions for all different applications; given the scope of the problem, the immaturity of existing tools, and the evolving standards environment, building these solutions is a challenging task.

The objective of this tutorial is to give an overview of XML data management, presenting both the major issues involved in managing such data and solutions for them. Topics covered in this tutorial include: storing, querying, updating, and publishing XML data. Special emphasis will be given to concrete techniques for developers, making clear how properties of an application area influence the solution.

Facilitators:

Michael Benedikt is a Member of Technical Staff in the Network Data and Services Research Department at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. He got his Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Wisconsin in 1993, and joined AT&T Bell Labs immediately afterward to work on verification of software. His research interests include program verification, query analysis and integrity constraint enforcement in databases, query language support for spatial databases, and transformation languages for XML.

Mary Fernandez is Principal Technical Staff Member in Large-Scale Programming Research at AT&T Labs - Research. She received the Ph.D. in Computer Science from Princeton University. Her research interests include data integration, Web-site implementation and management, and domain-specific languages. Currently, she is working on query languages and storage systems for XML. She is a member of the W3C XML Query Language Working Group and is co-editor of the following W3C working drafts: the XQuery 1.0 and XPath 2.0 Data Model, XPath 2.0, and the XQuery 1.0 Formal Semantics.

Juliana Freire is a Member of the Technical Staff in the Network Data and Services Research Department at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. She received a BS from Federal University of Ceara (Brazil), and MS and Ph.D. from the University at Stony Brook, all in Computer Science. Her research interests include information integration, ubiquitous access to the Web, and data management issues related to XML. Currently, she is working on efficient techniques to store and query XML in relational databases. Dr. Freire has co-authored two books, and has published extensively in the fields of Web, databases and logic programming.

Arnaud Sahuguet is a Member of the Technical Staff in the Network Data and Services Research Department at Bell Laboratories, Lucent Technologies. He graduated from the Ecole Polytechnique in 1994 and from the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees in 1996. He got his Ph.D. in computer science at the University of Pennsylvania in December 2001. His research interests include cryptography and electronic commerce, information retrieval/extraction and database technology including XML. He is the co-developer of W4F, a rule-based HTML-to-XML screen-scraper and the main architect of Kweelt, an open-source Java implementation of the Quilt query language (now XQuery).

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TF2 - SMIL 2.0

SMIL 2.0 specifies interactive multimedia on the Web. It has just been released as a W3C recommendation. It already enjoys substantial support, implemented in such Web browsers as RealNetworks' RealOne and Internet Explorer 6.0. This version of SMIL extends SMIL 1.0, a W3C recommendation since June 1998. SMIL 2.0 is 15 times as large as SMIL 1.0, and defines a family of languages rather than just one language. This tutorial presents SMIL 2.0, tools for it, how to create presentations in it, and how it has currently been adopted by the community at large.

The goal of the tutorial is to explain the concepts that form the basis of the SMIL language and to provide sufficient detail on the language itself so that participants can create their own simple presentations. Participants will also understand the underlying issues of temporal and spatial layout and the complexity of creating links within multimedia. They will also be able to use available tools to play and create SMIL presentations.

Before describing the details of the SMIL 2.0 language, the tutorial first presents an overview of the components required in a hypermedia document description language. The SMIL language includes features for specifying the media items included in a document, referred to with URL's, how these are temporally and spatially related to one another, and how links can be specified within the multimedia environment. Alternates for different data formats for the heterogeneous web environment are also provided.

The tutorial is intended for content developers who have created HTML documents or have used tools such as Macromedia Director or Authorware. Multimedia designers, web-page creators, creators of interface prototypes such as user interface designers, human factors practitioners and industrial designers will also benefit from this course.

Presenter:
Lloyd Rutledge is a researcher at CWI, the Dutch national center for computer and mathematics research. His research involves adaptable hypermedia, and standards for it such as SMIL. He received his Sc.D. from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, where he worked with the Distributed Multimedia Systems Laboratory (DMSL) on developing the HyOctane HyTime-based hypermedia environment. Dr. Rutledge is a member of the W3C working group that developed SMIL. He is also co-author of "SMIL: Interactive Multimedia on the Web", to be published in May by Pearson Education.

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TF3 - XTM - XML Topic Maps

Topic maps are a new ISO standard providing a powerful paradigm and an XML-based exchange syntax for the organisation and navigation of large and continuously growing amounts of information, like the Web. Topic maps are - together with RDF - a base technology of the Semantic Web and numerous other application domains dealing with the challenges of info-glut.

The tutorial will provide the delegates with substantial knowledge about topic maps, their concepts, the differences to RDF, and their applications, and how to develop them. Furthermore, a workshop-like interactive creation of an example topic map will make the tutorial very valuable for the attendees. At the end of the day, the participants learned how to apply topic maps to their own information resources and are able to use topic maps with the freely distributed software.

The tutorial is divided in six parts:

Parts II and III close with intensive exercises giving the attendees the opportunity to create together supported by course instructor their own topic map.

Basic XML knowledge is helpful, but not necessary. The delegates should have an understanding of the information resources their companies are working with to contribute to and to benefit from the topic map creation during the tutorial.

Presenter:
H. Holger Rath is Director Research & Development at empolis GmbH - a Germany based globally operating company offering premium products and services for content management and knowledge management. Holger started at STEP Electronic Publishing Solutions GmbH - a company acquired byempolis - in 1996 as senior consultant and project manager and headed the consulting department from 1998-2001. Before he joined STEP he was head of the department Document Computing at the Computer Graphics Center (ZGDV) - the co-host of the 3rd WWW conference. Holger graduated at the University of Darmstadt with the doctoral thesis "Literate Specifying of Hypermedia Documents".

Holger represents Germany in the ISO standards committee, which is responsible for SGML, DSSSL, HyTime, and Topic Maps. He is co-author of the new ISO standard initiative TMQL (Topic Map Query Language) and founding member of the OASIS Member Section TopicMaps.Org. Numerous national and international presentations and publications as well as more than eleven years experience in information re-engineering prove his competence.

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WF1 - Semantic Web Workshop

Workshop Web site: http://semanticweb2002.aifb.uni-karlsruhe.de/

The "Semantic Web" is used to denote the next evolution step of the Web, which establishes a layer of machine understandable data. The data is suitable for automated agents, sophisticated search engines and interoperability services, which provide a previously not reachable grade of automation. The ultimate goal of the Semantic Web is to allow machines the sharing and exploitation of knowledge in the Web way, i.e. without central authority, with few basic rules, in a scalable, adaptable, extensible manner.

Relevant workshop topics include but are not limited to:

The Workshop gives the attendants the possibility to discuss ideas, problems and visions in depth and face to face. The objective of the workshop is to bring researchers and developers of the Semantic Web together not only to represent mature work, but also to discuss the ongoing development in order to allow for smoother and faster progression of the Semantic Web. We plan to limit the number of formal presentations and concentrate on discussion sessions instead.

Facilitators:
Steffen Staab is assistant professor at the University of Karlsruhe. His interests lie in semantic representation and reasoning, in engineering and learning of semantic structures, as well as in building web applications that put these techniques into practice. Steffen has published in all of these areas at major conferences and he has co-chaired and co-organized several international workshops on topics like ontologies, learning, and knowledge management, including the Semantic Web workshop at WWW-10 in Hongkong.

Natalya F. Noy is a research scientist at Stanford Medical Informatics. Her interests lie in building large semantics-based systems, automatic and semi-automatic integration of knowledge on the Web, and applications of the Semantic Web technology to medicine. She is a member of the development team of the Protégé ontology engineering system.

Martin Frank is a computer scientist at the University of Southern California's Information Sciences Institute and a research assistant professor in the Computer Science Department. His interests are in cooperative negotiation, real-time distributed scheduling, and end-user applications of the Semantic Web. He is a participant in DARPA's Agent Markup Language (DAML) and Autonomous Negotiation Systems (ANTs) programs.

All three organizers have done research on the foundations and applications of the Semantic Web and are currently active in semantic web activities such as DAML.

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WF2 - Workshop On Mobile Search

Workshop Web site: http://www.haifa.il.ibm.com/Workshops/www2002-MobileSearch/

The dramatic increase in the use and availability of mobile devices such as cellular phones and Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) in the last few years has resulted in the ability to access information anytime and anywhere. IDC, a leading provider of technology intelligence, forecasts that by the end of 2002 there will be more wireless subscribers capable of Internet access than wired Internet users. Yet, we are still far from realizing the dream of having Web information as conveniently accessible from a handheld device as it is from our desktop. Existing information discovery mechanisms for searching and browsing the Web are not well suited to mobile devices, which are limited in terms of processing power and memory, screen real estate, input capabilities, networks and bandwidth.

In this workshop, we will explore several issues involved in making mobile search both practical and effective, and investigate the various challenges imposed in attempting to bring search to the mobile world. Topics may include:

Facilitators:
Bay-Wei Chang is a Senior Research Scientist at Google, Inc. He developed the first production version of Google WAP Search, worked with Google's wireless team to develop Google Number Search for easier phone querying, and designed user interfaces for small-display devices. He was previously at Xerox PARC, where his research revolved around user interface issues in web editing, portable document readers, and hypertext annotations. Previous to that he was at SunLabs, where he worked on object-oriented languages, programming environments, and cartoon- inspired animation in user interfaces. He received his PhD from Stanford University.

Yoelle S. Maarek is a research staff member at the IBM Research Lab in Haifa, Israel, where she heads the Knowledge Management Department. Her research interests include information retrieval, Internet applications, and software reuse. She graduated from the Ecole Nationale des Ponts et Chaussees in Paris, France, and received her DEA (graduate degree) in Computer Science from Paris VI University in 1985. She received a PhD from the Technion in Haifa, Israel, in January 1989. Before joining the Haifa Lab, Dr. Maarek was a research staff member at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center. She serves on the program committees of several international conferences (including the WWW series and SIGIR) and is a member of the Review Board of the WebNet Journal. She has published over 30 papers in referred journals and conferences, and is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology.

Aya Soffer is a Research Staff Member at the IBM Research Lab in Haifa, Israel, where she manages the 'Information Retrieval' Group. Her group has developed several mobile solutions for IBM products including a full-text search engine for Palm OS based devices (Pirate Search) and a mobile client for the Lotus Discovery Server. Aya received her MS and PhD degrees in Computer science from the University of Maryland at College Park in 1992 and 1995, respectively. Before joining IBM, she was a research scientist at NASA Goddard space flight center, where she worked on digital libraries for earth science data. She is an expert in non-traditional data retrieval issues and Web information retrieval. Her research interests include mobile search, information retrieval, pictorial information systems, multidimensional indexing and non-traditional database systems.

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WF4 - Second International Workshop on Web Dynamics

Workshop Web Site: http://www.dcs.bbk.ac.uk/webDyn2/

The World-Wide-Web is of strategic importance as a global repository for information and a means of communicating knowledge. Since the first Web Dynamics Workshop held in January 2001, there has been a continuous deployment of novel technologies to cope with dynamic change within the Web, and a rise of new technologies to address new challenges. Examples of the former are the success of search engine technology in delivering up-to-date information and the realisation of the importance of security-related issues, and an example of the latter is the semantic Web which is aiming to facilitate interaction with the Web through automated Web services.

The aim of this second Web Dynamics Workshop is to bring together researchers from academia and industry who are working on novel approaches to managing and interacting with the Web. In particular, there is a need to understand and manage the dynamics of the Web - how its information content, topology, and usage change, and what kinds of models and techniques will scale up to the rate of change.

The topics of interest of the workshop include, but are not restricted to, the following list:

  • adaptive hypertext
  • agents on the Web
  • collaborative filtering and recommender systems
  • communities on the Web
  • consistency of the Web
  • data and text mining on the Web
  • discovery and sharing of information and knowledge on the Web
  • economic foundations
  • formal reasoning about Web dynamics
  • intelligent browsing and navigation of the Web
  • modelling the Web as an evolving random network
  • modelling the Web as a small world
  • novel models of computation over the Web
  • push technology and Web reactivity
  • querying and searching the Web
  • query/search optimisation
  • transaction processing over the Web
  • views over the Web
  • web crawling strategies
  • web design metrics
  • workflow over the Web

Facilitators:
Please refer to our personal web pages to learn more about Mark Levene and Alexandra Poulovassilis from School of Computer Science and Information Systems, Birkbeck College, University of London

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WF5 - E-Learning : Learning Objects & Standards

Workshop Web site: http://www.gla.ac.uk/rcc/www2002workshop/

The Web continues to have an enormous and constantly changing impact on learning and education. The use of the Web to deliver teaching/training materials is now commonplace but there is an ever increasing need for the development of e-learning standards. Much of the basic content used in courses around the world is similar (ie Algebra and Accounting 101) and many are recognising the expense and time being wasted "re-inventing the wheel"

The focus of this workshop will be on developing re-usable learning objects, best practice, standards and copyright/IP issues of sharing generic content. Subject to the position papers received, the workshop will focus on many or all of the following topics:

Registration for the workshop will be subject to the submission of a position paper which should describe the participants' experince with e-learning and their hopes and expectations for the workshop. The call for position papers, the position papers themselves and a report of the workshop will all be made available on the workshop web site.

Facilitators:
Dave Whittington is a lecturer at the Robert Clark Centre, University of Glasgow. Dave has participated in, helped organize and/or chaired teaching and learning related workshops at the last six WWW conferences.

Melissa Labura is the Web & Multimedia Manager for the Department of Electrical & Electronic Engineering, University of Melbourne. Melissa has attended, presented at and helped organise all the workshops since WWW7.

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WF6 - Real world RDF and Semantic Web applications

Workshop Web site: http://www.cs.rutgers.edu/~shklar/www11

The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is the World Wide Web Consortium's specification for defining machine-understandable metadata. In the long term, we expect that RDF in conjunction with other standards such as WSDL, SOAP, UDDI and XML will serve as the foundation for Semantic Web applications. However, it is possible to take immediate advantage of the various standards by using RDF models in conjunction with them for building advanced Web services.

The objective of this workshop is to discuss commercial applications that make immediate advances and to gain insight into the evolution of the semantic web technology. Early commercial applications that make use of machine-understandable metadata range from information retrieval to Web-enabling of old-tech IBM 3270 sessions. Current developments include metadata-based Enterprise Application Integration (EAI) systems, data modeling solutions, and wireless applications. Machine-understandable metadata is emerging as a new foundation for component-based approaches to application development. Within the context of reusable distributed components, Web services represent the latest architectural advancement.

We invite submissions that discuss real applications (piloted, deployed, robust prototypes) attacking real world problems in the Semantic Web arena today instead of the future. This potentially means very pragmatic decisions (e.g., executable agents that run in the context of graph-based application models) caused by the limitations of today's technology (e.g., are there robust/scalable RDF parsers, stores, and inference engines?). Submissions that also address issues related to the business aspects, e.g., is there a market ?, is there a sustainable value proposition ?, what is the business model, etc., will receive special consideration. Some topics are:

Facilitators:
Vipul Kashyap works in the areas of Information and Knowledge Integration and Management, E-commerce and Semantic Web technologies. He has been active in the Semantic Web research community. He was a facilitator of the track on Interoperability, Integration and Composition at the First International SWWS and has organized panels and workshops on related topics. Vipul has worked at R&D Labs of MCC and Telcordia Technologies (formerly known as Bellcore) on issues related to Information Integration and Agent based infrastructures and is the recipient of a Ph.D. from Rutgers University. His research interests are: interoperation across multiple domain ontologies on the Semantic Web and issues of loss of information as a consequence of ontology mismatches. He is also investigating the feasibility of using sociological approaches for creating and evolving knowledge on the Semantic Web. Vipul has recently published a book on Information Brokering, has participated in panels, has been a member of conference program committees. He has published around 40 research articles and papers at various conferences and prestigious journals. Vipul can be contacted at: vipul_kashyap@yahoo.com

Leon Shklar is the CTO at Information Architects. He is also a part-time lecturer at the Computer Science department at the Rutgers University in New Jersey. Leon has received his Ph.D. in C.S. from Rutgers University in NJ. He chaired the workshop on Web Engineering at the WWW8 conference in Toronto, the workshop on Internet Middleware and Data Modeling at the WWW7 Conference, and the workshop on Object Oriented Web Servers and Data Modeling at the WWW6 Conference. He also presented tutorial on Web Access to Legacy Data at the WWW5 Conference in Paris. Leon can be contacted at: shklar@cs.rutgers.edu

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WF7 - Web Content Accessibility

The aim of this workshop is to raise the awareness and efficiency of the work being done to make the web more accessible. The workshop will facilitate the interaction of several working groups from what are considered relevant international communities in their work to increase accessibility of the web: W3C Working group members, IMS Working group members and Dublin Core Working group mambers and any others interested in making the web more accessible. Members of the three organisations involved have sought this opportunity to work together and will welcome others who can asssist them.

The main topics for consideration will be:

Registration will be open. the issues will be canvassed publicly and participants will be able to contribute to the sessions. A small committee will be formed to work on the agenda and choice of presenters. Organisations working in the same field will be invited to propose panel presenters. presenters will be expected to research topics so that action on the day is fast and focussed - and of interest to those who participate.

Facilitator:
Liddy Nevile has organized/facilited workshops many times before including at WWW7 and WWW10. For WWW2002, Liddy is a co-chair for the Global Community track. She has also facilitated three meetings about accessibility similiar to this session.


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Last Reviewed: 4/28/02
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