WWW10 Half-Day Tutorials Description
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WWW10 Half-Day Tutorials Description



 
TA1 WebDAV: The Writable, Collaborative Web

At present, the Web is primarily a read-only medium, providing excellent support for browsing content, and limited support for authoring new content. WebDAV is a standard developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) for extending the Web with collaborative authoring capability, and is supported by such industry-leading tools as Office 2000, Photoshop 6, GoLive Internet Explorer 5, Mac OS X, Apache, Internet Information Services 5, and Jigsaw, and Web storage sites such as Driveway, My Docs Online, and Sharemation.

This tutorial gives an overview of the WebDAV Distributed Authoring protocol (RFC 2518), the WebDAV Access Control Protocol, and the related DAV Searching and Locating (DASL) effort. This is a novice-to-intermediate level tutorial, which assumes some knowledge about the hypertext transfer protocol (HTTP), although a brief overview of this protocol will be given during the course.

The WebDAV Distributed Authoring protocol provides operations for:

  • Overwrite Prevention: Locking facilities allow a document author to prevent modifications by other authors during an edit session, thus preventing the "lost update" problem.
  • Properties: WebDAV properties are name, value pairs that can be used to record metadata about a Web resource, such as its author, creation date, length, etc. WebDAV properties are well formed Extensible Markup Language (XML), and hence can support Resource Description Framework (RDF) values.
  • Collections: The ability to create sets of related documents and to retrieve a hierarchical membership listing (like a directory listing in a file system).
  • Namespace Operations: The ability to copy and move single Web resources, and to copy, move and lock entire hierarchies of Web resources.

By using these operations, both existing HTML authoring applications, as well as more traditional word processing, spreadsheet, and image manipulation applications can support remote collaborative authoring. Since a WebDAV-enabled application can save directly to the Web, and makes use of the overwrite prevention capabilities, these applications provide a way to seamlessly move from individual to collaborative work. So, using a WebDAV-enabled word processor, you can begin work on a document, and then later realize you need to add several co-authors. After saving your document to the Web, and emailing the URL to your collaborators, you can all begin to collaboratively work on the document in-place on the Web. Building upon its current strong base of supporting tools, in the next 1-2 years WebDAV is expected to be broadly adopted by content authoring tools.

This will bring the benefits of the Writable Web to millions of users, opening significant opportunities for Internet Service Providers, Web storage sites, document management, content authoring tools, protocol developers, and researchers. Furthermore, Web write-enabling existing applications are just the first phase of WebDAV adoption. Having widely deployed write capability on the Web will enable many new Web applications, and extensions to the WebDAV Distributed Authoring Protocol. For example, the DeltaV protocol (the focus of a WWW10 tutorial by Geoff Clemm) provides versioning and configuration management capabilities that build upon the WebDAV protocol. DeltaV will allow the Web to be used as the core infrastructure for remote software development, especially Open Source, replacing the remote CVS protocol. WebDAV is one of the most substantial, yet under-hyped changes to the core architecture of the Web. By attending this tutorial, you will develop a deep understanding of the capabilities and potential of this increasingly important standard.

Presenter:

Jim Whitehead is the Chair and Founder of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) working group on Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV), and is a co-author on all major specifications produced by this working group. Jim additionally spearheaded the formation of the DeltaV working group for Web versioning and configuration management. Jim has led several student teams developing prototype WebDAV implementations, including the WebDAV Explorer client. Additionally, Jim was a co-chair of the WWW7 HTTP-Future workshop. Jim is also an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research interests include hypertext versioning, collaborative authoring, Web protocols, open hypermedia (the Chimera system), configuration management, and software architecture. Jim has a Ph.D and MS in Information and Computer Science from U.C. Irvine (Ph.D. dissertation: "An Analysis of the Hypertext Versioning Domain"), and a BS in Electrical Engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

TA2 XML Boot Camp

The Extensible Markup Language (XML) is currently being touted as a technical innovation comparable in scope to sliced bread and the wheel. In this hands-on tutorial, we'll cut through the hype to show how XML is being used today to create revolutionary e-business applications. You'll learn how to create your own XML document types, how to use XML to exchange data with business partners and suppliers, how to deliver XML-tagged data to any client on any platform, and how to integrate XML technology with your existing systems. By the end of the tutorial, you'll be ready to deploy your own XML-based applications. Attendees should be familiar with HTML; familiarity with programming concepts will be helpful.

Presenter:

Doug Tidwell is a Senior Programmer at IBM. He has over thirteen years of development experience, and has been working with XML-like applications for several years. He is currently occupied as a Cyber Evangelist, helping people evaluate and implement XML and other technologies.

TA3 Designing Accessible Web Sites for Multifaceted Media

This tutorial will introduce and discuss the concepts of non-visual interaction used by visually disabled users, the W3C's Web Accessibility Initiative (WAI) accessibility guidelines, and the general design of Web pages for accessibility and usability, whether for disabled users or new media users. The Web Accessibility Initiative has developed guidelines to assist in the development of Web pages accessible and usable by people with a variety of disabilities, particularly those who interact with the Web non-visually. In addition, the Web is now seeing the emergence of a number of innovative media for which the usual graphic principles of page design no longer apply - increasingly, people want to interact rapidly with Web sites using convenient devices with small screens such as palmtop computers, mobile phone screens or straightforward speech-only access such as the telephone or in-car navigation systems. This tutorial will examine ways in which the design of Web content for these new multi-faceted media can be informed by experiences of designing for accessibility.

Presenter:

Helen Petrie is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Sensory Disabilities Research Unit and the National Centre for Tactile Diagrams at the University of Hertfordshire, UK. Her research interests include Web usability, the evaluation of wearable and mobile systems such as mobile phones and access to computer technology, especially the Web, for visually impaired users.

TA4 P3P

This tutorial is designed for software developers and Web site administrators who are interested in developing and/or using Internet privacy tools.

The first half of the tutorial will include an overview of online privacy issues , providing attendees with the necessary background to understand the social, legal, and policy context in which these issues exist. In this section the presenter will compare and contrast online and offline privacy concerns; discuss cookies, the HTTP referer field, and other technical mechanisms that raise privacy concerns; discuss the results of privacy surveys; provide an introduction to legal issues (in several countries) related to online privacy; and review several industry initiatives designed to address online privacy concerns.

The second half of the tutorial will include specific online privacy tools, and focus especially on the Platform for Privacy Preferences (P3P). The presenter will review several anonymity tools and discuss a variety of "infomediary" services. They will then discuss P3P in detail, describing the P3P protocol, P3P privacy vocabulary, and current P3P implementation efforts.

Online privacy issues are receiving increasing amounts of attention from lawmakers and media organizations around the world. The P3P specification is expected to become a W3C recommendation in the next few months and P3P products are expected in early 2001.

Presenter:

Marc Langheinrich received a master's degree in computer science from the University of Bielefeld, Germany, in 1997. Starting in the fall of 1995, he spent a year as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Washington, where he also completed his thesis work in the fields of information retrieval and software agents. In the fall of 1997 he joined NEC Research in Japan where he has been working on projects involving personalization and electronic commerce. Since October 1999 he is a research assistant in the Distributed Systems Group at the ETH Zurich, Switzerland.

TA5 XML Linking Technologies

Keywords: XML, links, containment, RDF, XLink, XPointer, Semantic Web, DTD, W3C XML Schema, XSLT.

Defining relationships between the nodes of a tree is a sensitive issue that had led in the nineties to the success of relational databases, tabular data being an extreme solution to this problem.

Bringing hierarchical structures back in front of the scene, XML has uncovered this old issue giving several different paths to explore to solve it.

These linking technologies also happen to be one of the foundations of the Semantic Web and the choices made in this area can facilitate the harvesting of semantic information in XML documents.

Left behind an increasing number of possibilities, XML designers need to understand and compare the different technologies. In this tutorial, we will explore some of the many ways to deal with the definition of links between nodes within a document or between documents.

The linking techniques covered in the tutorial will include containment, application specific links, DTD or XML Schema ID references, RDF and simple and extended Xlinks.

For each technology, we will take the same example and explore the impacts of the choice on:

  • Document syntax and complexity.
  • XSLT transformation focusing on link expansion.
  • XML DTD and W3C XML Schema validation.
  • Semantic information extraction.

This tutorial will be beneficial for XML developers and designers having a first knowledge of XML technologies (XML 1.0, Namespaces in XML 1.0).

Presenter:

Eric van der Vlist is a consultant and contributing editor for xmlhack (http://xmlhack.com) and XML.com (http://xml.com) for which he is written an article partially covering the subject: http://www.xml.com/pub/2000/10/04/linking/index.html

He has created and maintains <XML>fr ( http://xmlfr.org), a French portal dedicated to XML and 4xt (http://4xt.org), a resource site for XT users. Eric is a seasoned software engineer and active contributor to XML and XSL mailing lists. He is one of the authors of the RSS 1.0 proposal. He has developed and delivers several XML related trainings for IT engineers and managers, one of them covering the topic proposed here. He has an engineering degree (B.Sc.) from the Ecole Centrale de Paris.

TP1 WebDav Delta V: Adding Versioning to the Web

With the WebDAV (Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning) extensions to HTTP be coming widely implemented (available in both Apache and Microsoft IIS Web servers), the conversion of the Web from a read-only medium to a writeable collaboration mechanism is well underway. One of the most challenging aspects of the WebDAV effort has been to design a versioning protocol that balances the needs of simple history management for a single Web page with those of full scale configuration management of the development, deployment, and maintenance for an entire Web site. This tutorial will give an overview of the WebDAV protocol as defined in RFC-2518, and then will focus on the recently completed WebDAV versioning protocol. Some knowledge of HTTP and XML is assumed, although a brief overview will be provided.

Presenter:

Jim Whitehead is the Chair and Founder of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) working group on Web Distributed Authoring and Versioning (WebDAV), and is a co-author on all major specifications produced by this working group. Jim additionally spearheaded the formation of the DeltaV working group for Web versioning and configuration management. Jim has led several student teams developing prototype WebDAV implementations, including the WebDAV Explorer client. Additionally, Jim was a co-chair of the WWW7 HTTP-Future workshop. Jim is also an Assistant Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, Santa Cruz. His research interests include hypertext versioning, collaborative authoring, Web protocols, open hypermedia (the Chimera system), configuration management, and software architecture. Jim has a Ph.D and MS in Information and Computer Science from U.C. Irvine (Ph.D. dissertation: "An Analysis of the Hypertext Versioning Domain"), and a BS in Electrical Engineering from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

TP2 XML Schemas

This tutorial presents the XML Schema Language facilities for describing the structure and constraining the contents of XML documents. The tutorial begins with a review of the most recent XML Schema specification (Parts 1 and 2) -- elements, attributes, types, namespaces, processing rules, nulls, and more -- followed by an exploration of some schema design considerations in example schemas for e-commerce and e-publishing. In the process, discover some tools that simplify design, creation and maintenance. Basic knowledge of XML (or HTML) is suggested.

Presenter:

Henry S. Thompson is Reader in Artificial Intelligence and Cognitive Science in the Division of Informatics at the University of Edinburgh, based in the Language Technology Group of the Human Communication Research Centre. He was a member of the SGML Working Group of the World Wide Web Consortium which designed XML, is the author of the XED, the first free XML instance editor and co-author of the LT XML toolkit and is currently a member of the XSL and XML Schema Working Groups of the W3C. He currently holds a World Wide Web Consortium Fellowship, and is editor of the Structures part of the XML Schema draft W3C recommendation. He has presented many papers and tutorials on SGML, DSSSL, XML, XSL and XML Schemas in both industrial and public settings over the last five years.

TP3 The Shrinking Web Interface

We are entering a unique period in the history of computing where the synergy of the Internet and wireless networks, coupled with the myriad of "smart" mobile devices and newly-designed operating systems, are "revolutionizing" the way millions of people around the world live, work, play, and learn.

The Internet/Web has impacted an increasing number of people and businesses in a way no previous technology has done before. The Web has become a common place to send/receive e-mail, compare prices while you shop, conduct business banking transactions, check travel schedules, get maps and driving directions, and trade stocks on-line. The Internet/Web has fueled user demand for connecting to the Internet/Web from almost any electronic device. Today's mobile phones, pagers, personal digital assistants (PDAs) and other wireless devices routinely provide Web-based and e-mail content as well as other text messaging resources. The Internet/Web explosive growth will drive the accelerated adoption of wireless networks and communications for mobile applications.

The emergence of the mobile wireless Web access to the Internet has thrown up new opportunities and challenges in an already dynamic communications industry. In 1999, the number of mobile data users worldwide is 31.7 million, and in 2005, it is projected to be 1 billion. As more and more users are increasingly accessing the Internet from many classes of devices with different form factors, the same Web content needs to be rendered differently, taking into account limitations with respect to display (screen) size and capabilities, processing power (thin client), bandwidth connectivity, and types of applications.

Mobility and the "miniaturization" of the computing platform bring about new Web design considerations, but at the same time open up opportunities for new user experiences and interface design. The Web and the Extensible Markup Language (XML) will become the backdrop for this "shrinking" interface. Emerging technologies such as the Wireless Application Protocol (WAP) have established an architecture for accessing the Internet/Web while mobile.

This half-day tutorial will give insights into:

  • Underlying wireless technologies and device form factors
  • New types of specialized location and time based services
  • User Experience
  • Mobile design considerations for users, tasks and content
  • Accommodating diversity and integration of devices, network services and applications
  • Data Modeling
  • Wireless Application Protocol (WAP)
  • Challenges of Device-Independent Content
  • HTML, XML, XHTML, WML,...
  • New Requirements for Security
  • Mobile Computing Applications
  • Introduction to m-Commerce, Opportunities and Strategies
  • Future Trends and Directions

The intended audience for this tutorial is Web engineers, software developers, project and team leaders, consultants, information systems managers, application developers, Web designers and developers, e-commerce strategists and practitioners, researchers, and sales and marketing professionals.

Presenter:

Nick Smilonich is the director of Advanced Technology, Systems & Technology Group within Unisys Corporation. He has held numerous engineering, management and technical positions and has been involved in various strategic development areas such as computer architecture, data management, component-based development, operating systems, multimedia, user interfaces, and. mobile/wireless computing. Mr. Smilonich is also a chief Application Services technologist, responsible for service definitions, new technology directions and assessment, and standard product architectures.

Lynne Thompson is a distinguished software engineer at Unisys Corporation. She has been involved in various strategic development areas such as computer architecture, data management, multimedia, programming languages, user interfaces, Internet/Web, and mobile/wireless computing.

TP4 Secure E-Payments

In this tutorial, we will focus on secure electronic payment that is a key technology for electronic commerce. Handling payment over the Internet is the largest distinction between traditional web servers and web commerce servers. The success of an e-commerce transaction relies greatly on the e-payment mechanism in the e-commerce system, how convenient and how secure it is. E-commerce involves the exchange of forms of money for soft and hard goods and services. The tutorial will bring the latest R&D results and current application models to you.

After we present the basic payment processes, we will describe various electronic payment methods, including micro-payment, digital cash, digital check, smart card technology, as well as the SET (secure electronic transaction) standard, which is the most important payment standard over the Internet. We will also discuss e-payment technology development trends, including privacy protection and wireless payment.

Presenter:

Dr. Weidong Kou is the Principal Researcher of the E-Business Technology Institute (ETI) and Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of Hong Kong. He has been Adjunct Professor at the University of Maryland, and the Industrial Co-leader for a major e-commerce project of Canadian Institute for Telecommunication Research, funded by Canadian Government and industry.
Prof. Kou has over 12 years of North American industrial R&D and project management experience at IBM, AT&T, and Siemens. Before joining ETI, he was the Principal Investigator at IBM Centre for Advanced Studies in Canada. He was an Architect of a major IBM B2B e-commerce project for a national government from 1995 to 1997. Before joining IBM, he was the Chairman of the Imaging Committee at AT&T GIS Imaging Systems Division. Before joining AT&T, he was a Senior Software Engineer at Siemens Nexdorf Limited. He received various invention and technical excellence awards from IBM, AT&T, and Siemens.
In addition to over 40 published papers in journals and conferences, Prof. Kou has authored 9 US/Canadian patents/patent applications in secure online delivery, secure payment, privacy protection, secure tendering, key management, and online price control for electronic commerce. He published three books, Electronic Commerce Technology Trends (ISBN: 1-58347-009-3, IBM Press, March 2000), Networking Security and Standards (ISBN: 0-7923-9626-X, Kluwer Academic Publishers, February 1997), and Digital Image Compression: Algorithms and Standards (ISBN 0-7923-9626-X, Kluwer Academic Publishers, September 1995).
Prof. Kou has served as Co-Chair for international e-commerce conference series since 1998. The next conference in the series, International Symposium on Electronic Commerce, will be held in Hong Kong, April 26-28, 2001, and he serves as General Co-Chair. Prof. Kou is a Senior Member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE).

Dr. William Song is a senior researcher, managing special projects at e-Business Technology Institute (ETI). Since joining ETI, Dr. Song has investigated XML technologies, payment methods and applications, as well as mobile commerce. He has first hand experience on the IBM micro-payment system, and prototyped an e-shop model for storefront management, payment settlement, and daily business transaction management. He has extensive experience working with governments and industry.

TP5 SMIL

SMIL 2.0 specifies interactive multimedia on the Web. It will be released soon as a W3C recommendation, but is already the subject of much attention from major players. This version extends SMIL 1.0, a W3C recommendation since June 1998. SMIL 1.0 already has a major presence on the Web as the integration format for the RealPlayer media browser. It also is supported by QuickTime 4.1, the GRiNS editor and player, and several other players. This tutorial presents SMIL 1.0 and 2.0 and the tools for them.

SMIL 1.0 is a W3C recommendation, approved in June 1998 and now a strong presence on the Web, which provides a vendor-independent, declarative language for hypermedia presentations on the Web. With at least three players currently available, and with more and more presentations being posted on the Web, SMIL promises to do for interactive multimedia what HTML did for hypertext: bring it into every living room with an easy-to-author, readily implementable format and easily accessible players for it.

SMIL 2.0 is nearing completion and is expected to be released by the W3C in the first quarter of 2001. The specification document is 10 times the size of SMIL 1.0, offering many new, rich features and constructs. SMIL 2.0 also has the backing of major corporations, and is being incorporated into the RealPlayer, Internet Explorer and the GRiNS authoring environment.

Before describing the details of the SMIL language, the tutorial first presents an overview of the components required in a hypermedia document description language. The SMIL language includes features for specifying the media items included in a document, referred to with URL's, how these are temporally and spatially related to one another, and how links can be specified within the multimedia environment. Alternates for different data formats for the heterogeneous Web environment are also provided. The goal of the tutorial is to explain the concepts that form the basis of the SMIL language and to provide sufficient detail on the language itself so that participants can create their own simple presentations. Participants will also understand the underlying issues of temporal and spatial layout and the complexity of creating links within multimedia. The tutorial also describes the use of the major SMIL implementations: the RealPlayer, the GRiNS authoring environment, and HTML+SMIL on Internet Explorer.

The tutorial is intended for content developers who have created HTML documents or have used tools such as Macromedia Director or Authorware. Multimedia designers, Web-page creators, creators of interface prototypes such as user interface designers, human factors practitioners and industrial designers will also benefit from this course. It can also be followed usefully by participants unfamiliar with existing tools and environments. The level is introductory and expects knowledge of the Web at a user's level, not necessarily that of an HTML author. Familiarity with basic HTML constructs is desirable, though not necessary.

The goal of the tutorial is to explain the concepts that form the basis of the SMIL language and to provide sufficient detail on the language itself so that participants can create their own simple presentations. Participants will also understand the underlying issues of temporal and spatial layout and the complexity of creating links within multimedia. They will also be able to use available tools to play and create SMIL presentations.

Presenter:

Lloyd Rutledge is a researcher at CWI. His research involves adaptable hypermedia, and standards for it such as SMIL. He received his Sc.D. from the University of Massachusetts Lowell, where he worked with the Distributed Multimedia Systems Laboratory (DMSL) on developing the HyOctane HyTime-based hypermedia environment. Dr. Rutledge is a member of the W3C working group that developed SMIL and was involved in the development of CWI's GRiNS authoring and playback environment for SMIL.


Last Updated: March 20, 2001
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