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The architecture of an advanced wireless network

Considering the development of a wireless next generation network (NGN), the IP technology and the adaptation of its corresponding QoS-management mechanisms applied at the different layers of their wired counterparts such as WFQ-scheduling, resource reservation and signaling based on RSVP as well as QoS-enhanced OSPF-routing are currently subjects of careful investigations (cf. [19], [20], [28]). A main objective of their new architecture is the decomposition of their network elements and the separation into three levels of abstraction: the IP-based transport platform offering switching and forwarding functions of the core and access network, the control and signaling layer supporting resource and mobility management, e.g. home and foreign agent functionality of Mobile IP, call control and routing, as well as an application and multi-service layer (see Fig. 1). This multi-service platform includes adaptive and context-sensitive applications and it is running on top of such transport and control infrastructure.

\includegraphics[width=10cm]{figures/eric6.eps}
Figure 1: Structure of the wireless domain of an NGN.



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Bachmann

2002-02-21